Mitsubishi, ... and World War II Slave Labor

Frank Hoeffer

Excerpts from Frank Hoeffer's grandson's website

On June 29, 1945, American prisoners were transferred by train to a new camp, called Nagoya No. 10... We first worked for Marutsu Company unloading railroad cars of soya beans, of which the average weight was 100 kilos. The rations of food were not enough and work was too hard. Japanese interpreters laughed when complaints were made.

.. We were suffering from mosquito bites, lack of shoes and clothing. Sometimes all the Americans and some other nationalities would have to walk over three miles to work and when they arrived at their destination, a rest of only a few minutes was allowed. The Japanese soldiers who accompanied the work parties were very mean and bossy.

Conditions were going from bad to worse in our new camp. For 120 men, who were too old or weak, the Japanese officials had ordered half rations. Twenty or thirty days on this diet would result in death. All the working prisoners who got full rations, which was about 450 grams of rice, would allot part of their food to the sick men. A considerable number of Dutch prisoners were in Nahoya Camp No. 10 and all, except ten or twelve were not able to work, either because of old age, sickness or because they did not want to work. The so called interpreter of our camp looked like a mental case on the loose. He certainly was a poor specimen of a man. All he did when any complaints were made about food was to laugh and say all prisoners were no good.


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(Last Updated: January 15, 2004.)

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"The so called interpreter of our camp looked like a mental case on the loose. He certainly was a poor specimen of a man. All he did when any complaints were made about food was to laugh and say all prisoners were no good."

A Mitsubishi- Eclipse of Ethics presentation.